Slightly to the Right in New Jersey

Conservative comments on New Jersey

Chris Christie Answers the BIG Questions

I had so much fun making my first video, I decided to make another one!  Here it is:

I hope you enjoy it, and think about the answers that Chris Christie has given!

For Christie and all of the idiots in Trenton, “IT”S TAXES, STUPID!”

May 28, 2009 Posted by | Borrowing, Budget, Chris Christie, Christie, Corzine, Debt, democrats, Governor's Race, Illegal, illegal aliens, Illegal Immigrants, Liberals, Lonegan, New Jersey, Pay for Play, Property Taxes, Republicans, RINO, Taxes | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Chris Christie, from nothing to 51 ways to fix New Jersey in less than three months. (Final 11)

Well, let’s finish up our analysis of Chris Chrisitie’s 51 ways to fix New Jersey.  Hopefully, we can find a few ways that Chris can actually make happen, since up to now, it seems he can’t keep his word on most of these promises.  So getting right to it, here are the last eleven ways:

  • 41. I will eliminate special interest labor union giveaways that increase spending and taxes by ending the use of project labor agreements, which drive up the cost of public construction projects and fail to deliver a public benefit at a time when the economy is shedding jobs and taxpayers are struggling to make ends meet.  Once again, Chris makes a promise here that does not make a lot of sense.  First off, look at the last part of the promises, will he only eliminate these special labor union giveaways when the economy is bad?  Hey Chris, how about when the economy is good?  Further, will you have to have the legislature pass laws that will allow the use of non-union workers on state contracts?  Chris, please explain this promise so we can understand exactly what you want to do here.
  • 42. I will save taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars and expedite key projectsby utilizing innovative procurement methodologies like Design/Build/Operate/Maintain (DBOM).  Wow, save “hundreds of millions of dollars” !  Now that sounds like a real plan.  But, before going further, do you really know what DBOM is?  Design, Build, Operate and Maintain is a great idea, but not one that is possible in most government contracts for capital projects.  Let’s just use one simple area of state expenditures to show how silly this concept is, highways.  Designing a highway is a cooperative effort between the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the contractor who will actually build the project.  Of course building the project is the contractor’s responsibility, with the over site of DOT.  When the road is finally built, no contractor will “operate or maintain” the highway, since this is not their business.  They just are not equipped for this kind of business.  The responsibility for the operation and maintenance will go to DOT, since this is the reason this department exists.  Once again, can you give us an example of where you would apply DBOM and just how you came up with “hundreds of millions of dollars” of savings.
  • 43. I will eliminate the Legislature’s conflicts of interest by strengthening ethics laws to require State Legislators to either recuse themselves from legislative actions that affect their private sector interests, or publicly disclose these conflicts when they occur.  I think you better go back and study how democratic government works.  The governor cannot strengthen ethics laws, that is only something that can be done by the assembly and senate.  You might suggest that they pass those types of laws, but this is another promise you cannot keep.
  • 44. I will fully eliminate dual office-holding by our State’s elected officials by proposing immediate changes to state law.  Once again, this is a promise you can’t keep, since YOU cannot eliminate dual office-holding, only the assembly and senate can do that.  Of course, you can suggest that our elected officials pass a law like that, but that is all. 
  • 45. I will ban the practice of dual public employment, whereby one person holds a full-time government job while also holding a salaried, elected position. This is one item, that I believe is not just unconstitutional, but also un-american.  If a person has a job like police officer, fireman, teacher, department of public works employee, why should they not be allowed to exercise their constitutional rights and run for office.  Why can’t a police officer also be a school board member?  How about a teacher also being a town council member?   These elected offices do carry small stipend or salary, but to deny  a person their constitutional rights only because they are public employees, is just plain wrong!  What should be proposed though, is an elected official cannot then become a public employee in any position in which they would have authority over in their elected office, without first resigning from that office.  For example, a member of the school board, could not become a teacher in that school district until they resigned from the board.  Come on Chris, being a lawyer, you should know better than to step on people’s rights.
  • 46. I will reform New Jersey’s boards and commissions by only appointing those without conflicts of interest, refusing to create boards and commissions where the memberships create new conflicts of interest, and implementing statutory changes (as needed) to remove any current agency members with conflicts of interest.  I do believe this is one thing he can do, since the governor does appoint many members to various boards and commissions.  The only thing I see being an impediment, is the multitude of favors he will owe all of the people who have blindly endorsed him for governor.  Unless there has  been radical changes in how politics are carried out in New Jersey, these appointments are normally given to those who have supported the governor in one way or another.  Only time will tell if Chris will actually keep this promise, since it is one that he could keep.
  • 47. I will hold government officials accountable for their actions by requiring any elected or appointed official convicted of a crime connected to their official position to forfeit their pension benefits.  This promise will require more than Chris holding officials accountable.  Pension benefits are a contractual item.  They can only be modified or denied by negotiation or judicial methods, not by a governor’s whim.  Once again, I feel that this is a promise that Christie won’t be able to keep.
  • 48. I will strengthen our weak “pay to play” laws by eliminating special interest labor union loopholes to ensure labor unions are treated just like any other entities that have contracts with government.  This again is a promise that Christie can’t keep.  Only the assembly and senate can pass a law that would stop this practise.  One has to wonder how much of a chance that would have of passing, since the representatives and senators receive a lot of money from the unions.  One other thing also, will Christie push for a “Play then Pay” law which would prevent accepting campaign money from people who had benefited from contracts that one gave them prior to their seeking office?
  • 49. I will give New Jerseyans a stronger voice in government by amending the State Constitution to create a statewide initiative and referendum process to allow public questions to be placed on the ballot.  Chris, Chris, Chris, listen to what you said, “I will give New Jerseyans a stronger voice” but then you acknowledge that the State Constitution has to be amended.  Again, this is promise you can’t keep.  You can suggest this change be made, but unless the assembly and senate agree to ask for an amendment, this will go no where.
  • 50. I will provide New Jerseyans regularly occurring opportunities to petition for their government for action by amending the State Constitution to include a provision, whereby every 10 years, voters will have the opportunity to convene a popularly-elected Constitutional Convention.  Again, Chris has promised something he cannot deliver!  This would require an amendment to the state constitution.  This can only be done by the assembly and senate, not the governor!  Come on Chris, tell us how you could get this done.
  • 51. I will increase honesty and openness in government by requiring fully search-able and transparent websites for all state and local governments and school districts, providing links to property records and taxes, government payrolls, expenditures, school performance report cards, and other information. All information would be accessible to the public no later than 45 days following the close of each fiscal year.  Once again, here is a promise that he has not chance of keeping, and is just arrogant.  If he wants to do something like this, just stick to the state level.  Let the counties and local governments make their own rules.  The last thing Christie should be worrying about is local government.  In most cases in the state, this level of government is running pretty good, and would run better with less state interference, not more.  Chris, worry about the state, and let local government do what it does best, taking care of the citizens of the towns and cities they serve.

Well, that is a review of the 51 ways that Chris Christie says will fix New Jersey.  The problem I see with them, is that except for a few of them,  most of them are ones that he cannot do a thing about.  Most of them would require new laws, or constitutional amendments.  Others would require larger government, and more expenses, not less.   All of them though, have no example of just what he would do to keep these promises.  One would have more confidence in these promises, if Chris would offer specific examples of items he would change, and just how he would accomplish it.  Well, I for one always want to know if “Promises made” can actually become “Promises kept”.  I guess Chris does not want to have that being held over his head if he should become governor.

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Hey Chris Christie, it is great to have 51 ways to fix New Jersey, but don’t ever forget the most important thing of all, “IT’S TAXES, STUPID”!

April 17, 2009 Posted by | Borrowing, Budget, Chris Christie, Christie, Conservative, Corzine, Debt, democrats, Governor's Race, illegal aliens, Illegal Immigrants, Lawyers, Liberals, Lonegan, New Jersey, Pay for Play, Property Taxes, Republicans, Taxes | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Chris Christie, from nothing to 51 ways to fix New Jersey in less than three months. (Continued)

Hey kids, it is time to continue the analysis of Christ Christie’s 51 ways to fix New Jersey.  In the last episode, we examined the first 10 of these way, and found a lot lacking in them, lets see want the next 10 look like.

  • 11. I will require a “sunset” provision of four years on any new or expanded program and veto spending for any new (or expanded) program that doesn’t include such a provision. I’ll measure the performance of each and every government program. If a program isn’t serving taxpayers efficiently and effectively, I’ll eliminate it.  Now this one sounds great on the surface, but can anyone out there see the first flaw in this promise?  If anyone said the “FOUR YEARS” you get a cookie!  He will eliminate any program that is not serving the taxpayers, but only if we give him another term after the first one.  I guess in his mind this is a great idea, but what if he is elected and just plain sucks?  Do we give him another four years just so he might eliminate some programs?
  • 12. I will require a 2/3 majority vote to impose any new tax, or to increase existing taxes.By passing a State Constitutional Amendment, we can prevent massive tax increases in the future, like the 103 tax increases passed during the Corzine/McGreevey administrations.  Talk about a promise he could never keep!  He will require a 2/3 majority vote!  The only problem with this is he knows as well as anyone out in Internet land knows, this can only be mandated via an amendment to the constitution, and the chance of that happening, at least in the first four years are “slim and nil, and slim went to lunch!”
  • 13. I will save taxpayer dollars and end political cronyism by eliminating political patronage jobs.  Once again, a great idea, but he would only have control over those jobs he has direct control over.  Further, his previous history of giving out no bid-contracts to friends and associates does not bode well for him keeping this promise.
  • 14. I will lower overtime costs by reducing the number of state holidays and eliminating those not recognized as federal holidays.  Now this is a real interesting statement.  The only holiday I can think of that is a State holiday and not a Federal holiday is Lincoln’s birthday.  OK, he can eliminate that one, but except for non-contractual workers, he would have to negotiate this at contract time.  Once again, a hurdle that he cannot even think of addressing until contracts are up.  Great promise, but once again a fix he cannot possibly do in the first two or three years, and it would be open to backlash from the unions.
  • 15. I will increase efficiency and lower costs by changing to a single, unitary approach to state public employee compensation, benefits, and work rules – ending the separate statutes governing health benefits, antiquated civil service rules, and the collective bargaining agreements.   Again, big promises, but very little chance of doing.  Each union has it’s own negotiating committee and contract wants.  To say he will change to a single, unitary approach is just a wild dream.  Anyone who is in business and has to deal with multiple unions knows this (hey, it’s that business background again).  Just go ask a CEO of an airline how difficult it is to negotiate with multiple unions.  Getting any one union to agree to anything is a problem, but getting two or more to agree is just plain impossible.  Nice idea, but no chance of getting it done.
  • 16. I will fight pension abuse, starting with the removal of more than 300 political appointees who are a part of the pension system by virtue of being paid to attend monthly meetings of boards and commissions of which they are members.  This is one he actually might have a chance to accomplish.  The problem will be if those 300 political appointees are ones that the governor directly appoints.  If so, he could terminate their appointments and let them walk with the pension benefits they had accumulated up to that point only.  The one problem though, is if these people have been appointed by other entities, he will have no chance what so ever of getting rid of them.
  • 17. I will increase fairness and reduce costs by bringing state public employee compensation and benefits back in line with employees who have defined contribution plans (such as federal government employees) by closing defined benefit plans for new employees, and replacing them with defined contribution plans.  Once again, big words, but until contract negotiations begin, the existing contracts remain in effect and he cannot change them.  When the time does come though for contract negotiations, why will this only apply to new employees?  Why not stand tough and make it mandatory for ALL employees!  This is a change that will bring labor in New Jersey into the real world, the one that the normal taxpayer lives in.  It is going to be very interesting to see that negotiation being done by a person who has never negotiated any labor contracts.  I wish him luck, he is going to need it!
  • 18. I will eliminate pension and health benefits for all part-time employees and political appointees. Only full-time employees should qualify for a public pension.  Again, big words, but he can only eliminate those pension and health benefits for appointees that he appoints, not ones made by other people or agencies.  This is just another promise that has little if any value.
  • 19. I will require all new state hires and state employee retirees to contribute to their health insurance costs. Big promises again, but again, open to current contracts provisions and not something he can just do overnight.  It would take time until contracts come up for renewal and will be subject to negotiations.  Plus, why is it only new state hires, and retirees?  How about the current employees? 
  • 20. I will implement aggressive economic growth strategies via public-private partnerships like the “New Jersey Partnership for Action.” The Partnership for Action will save taxpayer dollars by consolidating Trenton’s many inefficient and ineffective fragmented economic development activities into one single agency.  Why do we need any of these economic development groups, strategies or an agency.  If a real business climate was developed in New Jersey, one that featured extremely low, or no corporate taxation, companies would be fighting each other to move to here!  Just look at states like Nevada, that have zero corporate taxes, their business growth is phenomenal!  This “promise” is nothing more than a smoke screen which would be like a shell game.  Move the pea around and then try and find it.  Here, move the activities around and see if anything changes. 

Well that wraps up another 10 of the 51 ways Chris Christie will fix New Jersey.  Right now, it looks like a lot of nothing and very little fixing.  But, we still have 31 more ways to investigate.  So stay tuned for the next episode of Chris “THE WHOPPER” Christie does New Jersey!

Hey Chris, you might have 51 ways to fix New Jersey, but don’t ever forget, “IT’S TAXES, STUPID!”

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April 12, 2009 Posted by | Borrowing, Budget, Chris Christie, Christie, Conservative, Corzine, Debt, democrats, Governor's Race, Lawyers, Liberals, Lonegan, New Jersey, Pay for Play, Property Taxes, Republicans, RINO, Taxes | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Chris Christie, from nothing to 51 ways to fix New Jersey in less than three months.

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Back in January, Chris Christie was asked what his plans, ideas and views on the multitude of problems that face New Jersey.  At that time, Chris had no answers for any of those problems.  In fact, until only two weeks ago, Chris had very little of anything to say on how he would fix New Jersey.  All he was running on was his record as a federal prosecutor and his record on corruption. 

A few things have changed for Chris in the past couple of weeks.  His reputation as a politician free of ethical problems has now been challenged.  This I will go into detail at another time, but for now it is enough to make him rethink his current campaign strategy.  What has gotten me really thinking, is how can anyone, go from no ideas, to fifty-one (51) in less than three months.  He has been campaigning very hard, especially at the card-check county conventions.  I just don’t see how he had anytime to sit down and really think these issues through.  Since, I believe that is the case, let’s take a look at each one over the next posts:

  1. I will change the way our state budgets its dollars by building our budget upward. I will first determine how much money we have, then determine our most important priorities, and then fund those top priorities. Less critical programs will have to wait.   Well, nothing new here!  Every other person who has run for or been elected has promised to do this.  Of course, Christie has no experience in governmental budgets, so I just don’t believe he is capable of keeping this promise since he has not record of doing it in the past.
  2. I will stop the instant renewals of ineffective programs by ending the practice of providing automatic incremental budget increases across the board, or requiring across-the-board cuts in programs. Across the board increases and cuts are an inefficient method of deciding what programs deserve increases, decreases or funding at all. Wow, what a promise this is, but it sure is long, how about we take a shot at shorting it first.  In short, good programs would get more money, bad programs would get less or none, effectively killing them.  So, another promise like any other candidate who has run before.  Only problem is, never has done anything like this before.  Well, promises are cheap, accomplishments are what really counts.
  3. I will insist that every spending program be placed on the table for discussion come budget time before it is funded. Golly gee, I hate to tell Christie this, but this is how all New Jersey budgets are made.  The Governor makes the original budget, than the Assembly and Senate, add, subtract, add, subtract, but in the end, manly add.  I guess he can keep this promise, since it already is being done.
  4. I will make full use of my veto pen – the absolute veto, conditional veto, and line-item veto – to shape legislative and budget policy.  I guess like any child who would have new toys, he would like to use these veto powers.  The problem I again see, is that he has never used anything like this before.  Well, one can only hope that he would use them when he got to Trenton.
  5.  I will rely only on recurring revenue to balance our state budget, not one-shot gimmicks like federal stimulus aid or other revenue unlikely to recur in future years.  Now, this sounds pretty good, except for one thing, he does not include borrowing to balance the budget, like previous governors have done, in-spite of the fact the constitution of the State of New Jersey only allows borrowing with approval of the voters.  I guess he does not think that is important enough for him.
  6. I will save taxpayer dollars with an independently-elected State Auditor who will focus on annual audits of accounts and funds. Beyond the Auditor’s stricter accounting, the office will save additional tax dollars by combining the overlapping and ineffective efforts of political appointees like the State Auditor, Comptroller, State Commission of Investigation, and Inspectors General.  Now we are getting into some good stuff!  Here, he wants to create another taxpayer funded position, that will require staff, offices, outside contractors, etc.  Further, he wants to get rid of investigators, and inspectors.  Don’t you think it might be a better idea to get the people who are already being paid to do their job, rather than create a whole new bureaucracy?
  7. I will run our state government like a business by having the State Auditor conduct regular performance reviews on all state programs, local governments and school districts to ensure they are performing their intended purpose with respect and care for tax dollars.  What is he really saying here?  First he says he will run the state government like a business, when he has no experience at all running any type of business.  Then he goes on to say he will give that task over to another person (the new bureaucracy he created) and they will go after local governments and local school districts.  Hell, most small towns and school districts would work better with less state government, not more!
  8. I will recoup wasted taxpayer dollars by appointing a Special Prosecutor to conduct a thorough audit of government programs and will seek reimbursement of misspent funds until our State Auditor is in place.  You have to love lawyers!  No matter where they go, or what they do, they will always find something for their lawyer friends to do.  Once again, he wants to increase the size of government, without first holding accountable the people who are suppose to be doing this job!
  9. I will increase accountability in our spending practices by barring private sector companies who misspend or overspend state funds from future state contracts until they provide restitution back to the state.  If I read this right, he wants the companies that currently do business with the state, to give the state it’s monies worth.  If not, the companies would not be allowed to do further business with the state.  Damn, what a rocket scientist statement! Of course, if he already had any idea of how a company work, no purchasing agent in his right mind would ever make another purchase, or give another contract to someone who had already screwed his company.  I guess Christie does not quite understand the statement he made in item #7. Oh, by the way, there is no such thing as a public sector company Chris, unless you are including GM, Chrysler, AIG and such. 
  10. I will eliminate wasteful and inappropriate state purchases by appointing a “Taxpayer Advocate” in the Division of Purchase and Property to audit each and every government purchase order until our State Auditor is in place. No more $600 cellphones for state employees.  Once again, here Christie goes increasing the size of government!  He will hire a “Taxpayer Advocate” who will audit every purchase order.  Of course, the advocate will need a staff, offices, investigators, etc., etc., etc.  Let me give him one small piece of advise, and maybe save us a ton of money.  Why not promise just to fire anyone who buys $600 cellphones?  A real businessman would do that, without the need of an advocate!

Well, that is enough for this post.  Ten of the Fifty-one ways Chris Christie hopes to fix New Jersey, and the sense I get from them, is he wants to increase government, and run it like a business, in which he has not experience doing.  Well, I will get the next ten ways up soon, and maybe we can understand just what Christie is planning, I hope.

Well until next time kids, just remember, Chris Christie, and all of the idiots in Trenton, “IT’S TAXES, STUPID!”

 

April 9, 2009 Posted by | Budget, Chris Christie, Christie, Conservative, Corzine, Debt, democrats, Governor's Race, Lawyers, Liberals, Lonegan, New Jersey, Pay for Play, Republicans, RINO, Taxes | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Senator Lautenberg makes a fool out of himself again!

You have to love our Senator Lousyberg.  Talk about making a fool out of himself, he also takes all of the others down too!

Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) predicted on Thursday that none of his Senate colleagues would “have the chance” to read the entire final version of the $790-billion stimulus bill before the bill comes up for a final vote in Congress. “No, I don’t think anyone will have the chance to [read the entire bill],” Lautenberg told CNSNews.com.

Now folks, what is the first thing you are told to do before you sign anything, READ IT OVER and UNDERSTAND IT!  It is this same reasoning that caused all of the problems in the mortgage market, people not knowing what they are signing!  Of course they then run back and say “I didn’t know that was what I was agreeing to”!  The only problem with this, is we have to pay for the mistakes. 

This jerk is going to approve spending $790 BILLION and not read what he is approving?  This is the best that New Jersey can do?  This jerk should be in an old age home having someone change his diaper.

February 13, 2009 Posted by | Borrowing, Budget, Congress, Crooks, Debt, democrats, Liberal Media, Liberals, New Jersey, Republicans, TARP | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wow, what a plan from Governor Stupidhead Corzine!

It has always been said, “When the going gets tough, the tough get going”!  Nothing could be truer when it comes to the current financial situation in New Jersey, and the reaction of Governor Stupidhead to it. 

The Governor’s solution to these problems does not include things like reining in the outrageous union contracts the state is forced to pay.  It does not include eliminating departments and programs that duplicate efforts that are already addressed by the national programs (ie. DEP vs. EPA).  No, Governor Stupidhead is taking the really tough course, he is putting on his knee pads, and will be asking for $4.3 billion from the Economic Stimulus Scam!  What a gutless wonder we have for a Governor!

Hey Governor Stupidhead, we are coming for you in November, so start packing up your knee pads, your Rolodex of socialist friends because we will be giving your walking papers.  Until then, you and the other idiots in Trenton should never forget, “IT’S TAXES, STUPID!”

February 10, 2009 Posted by | Borrowing, Budget, Corzine, Crooks, Debt, democrats, Liberals, New Jersey, Republicans, TARP | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Governor Stupidhead’s Pit

The executive director of NJ Transit, Richard F. Sarles, wrote a rebuttal in NJ Voices (NJvoices.com) to an opinion about the Mass Transit Tunnel (MTT), which I now refer to as Governor Stupidhead’s Pit.  In the rebuttal, Sarles talks about how the new tunnel will benefit commuters, another way of saying that the real winner here is New York City.  But, one good thing came out of this, and that is his mentioning of 6,000 construction and related jobs, and a drop in air pollution by taking 22,000 cars off the highways.  This confirmation of these numbers can now lead to a crunching of these numbers and figuring out just what this will cost us.

In industry, it is typical to buy capital improvements with an outlook to getting the total return on investment within 18 months.  The price of this tunnel is calculated to be 9 billion dollars.  If we take the elimination of 22,ooo cars as realistic, it will cost $410,000 to remove each car.  Let’s say for this argument we figure each car has four passengers who will now take the train.  So it will cost $102,500 to for each new passenger who will use this tunnel.  If we assume that each passenger will go to work 250 days per year, then in 18 months he/she will have made 375 round trips.  In order to get an 18 month return on investment, each round trip will have to cost $273.00.  I don’t think anyone is going to pay that price.  Now, lets say the cost of a round trip is $27.00 per, it will take 15 years to pay for the tunnel.  Some might say that is a good deal, but just remember, all of the fare would have to go towards paying for the tunnel, what about the cost of the train?  From my viewpoint, this investment is not that good, and will result in the taxpayers of New Jersey having to subsidise this venture.

Sarles also writes about the jobs that will be created in the construction of this tunnel.  Let’s see how much each job will cost.  As I wrote before, they figure that 6,000 jobs will be created.  If we divide 6,000 into 9 billion dollars, the cost for each job will be $1.5 million.  Now, I don’t know where you come from, but where I come from, that is no bargain at all.

Once again, we do not need this tunnel!  It will only benefit New York City.  The cost of the tunnel can never be recouped, but will have to be subsidised by the taxpayers of New Jersey.  And the idea of creating jobs at $1.5 million per job is just plain stupid!  Why not take the money that New Jersey is suppose to contribute ($3 billion) and spend it to benefit the citizens of New Jersey?

To Richard R. Sarles, Governor Stupidhead, and the other idiots who are trying to force this tunnel down are throats, it is just a plain stupid idea, plus don’t ever forget, “IT’S TAXES, STUPID!”

February 7, 2009 Posted by | Budget, Corzine, Debt, democrats, Hudson River Tunnel, Liberals, New Jersey, Republicans, Stupid, Tolls | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The New School Bonds

Have you heard the latest radio ads for the   “The New Jersey Economic Development Authority, School Facilities Construction Program?”  These are the bonds that Governor Stupidhead and the other idiots in Trenton are issuing that will result in another $4 billion of debt.  But, before you run out to buy these bonds, you better read this first:

What is a New Jersey Appropriation-Backed Bond?
Appropriation-Backed bonds are issued by a New Jersey Independent Authority (for example, the New Jersey Economic Development Authority or the New Jersey Transportation Trust Fund Authority).  Appropriation-Backed bonds are used for various projects including school construction, road construction, and facilities for individuals with special needs.  Appropriation-Backed bonds are secured by payments received by the Independent Authority from the State pursuant to a contract, lease or other agreement between the State and the Independent Authority in which the State agrees to make payments equal to the debt service and other costs relating to the bonds. However, such payments are subject to appropriation from time to time by the New Jersey State Legislature and the State Legislature has no legal obligation to make such appropriations. Appropriation-Backed bonds are not general obligations of the State.

What they are saying is that we the people of New Jersey do not have to pay them back!  Now considering how much debt we have incurred lately in this state, the prospect of actually defaulting could be pretty high. 

For all of the idiots in Trenton, bankruptcy is not out of the question in this state, but until we can clean house and get our accounts back in order next November, just remember, “IT’S TAXES, STUPID!”

January 21, 2009 Posted by | Abbott Districts, Borrowing, Budget, Corzine, Crooks, Debt, democrats, Liberals, New Jersey, Recession, Schools, Schools New Jersey | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Governor Stupidhead says we are saved!

Today it was reported that Governor Stupidhead or Governor Corzine to the dem-lite’s, says that New Jersey is close to $4 billion in stimulus money.  Wow, we can now just sit back, have another beer and our worries are over.  And if the stimulus money from the OH-GREAT Wizard of Obama is based on population, New Jersey might even get $6 billion. 

What the hell is Governor Stupidhead trying to sell us here anyway?  This money is nothing but a loan that the United States has to assume.  This kind of fiscal planning is the same crap idea that has swollen the debt owed by New Jersey to $40 billion already and is growing larger by the minute since all of the projected income from the taxes that now make New Jersey the most taxed state in the country are not delivering what the idiots in Trenton thought it would!  And folks, no matter if the debt is owed by New Jersey or by the United States, do you know who really owes the debt?  Look in the mirror, because it is YOU!

Hey Governor Stupidhead, we can see right through what you and the great Obama are doing.  We will take care of one mistake this November and the other in four years, but until that time, just remember; “IT’S TAXES, STUPID!”

January 21, 2009 Posted by | Borrowing, Budget, Corzine, Debt, democrats, Liberals, New Jersey, Recession, Republicans, TARP, Taxes | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Hudson River Railroad Tunnel

Thursday, it was announced that the federal government had approved giving $3 billion in federal funding to build the new Hudson River Railroad Tunnel.  Here is the link to the full story as reported in the Star Ledger:

http://www.nj.com/starledger/stories/index.ssf?/base/news-12/1231997169199520.xml&coll=1

It took me awhile to think about this, since some of the claims made did not make any sense, in light of the information that I had posted a few days ago.  At that time, the claim was made that 4,000 jobs would be created for the $8.7 billion that would be spent on this Choo-Choo tunnel.  If you did the math, each job would be created for $2,175,000.00 per job, or $310,000.00 per year over the seven year period estimated that the construction would take. Now, the claim is made that this project will create 40,000 to 50,000 jobs!  Well, lets do the math again.  If we can get 50,000 jobs, that would be $174,000.00 per job, or $24,857.00 per year of the project.  Now, that sounds great except for the fact that no construction worker in New Jersey would do the job for about 25 thousand a year.  so it seems that the 40,000 to 50,000 is just not a real figure on job creation.  Also, think about this, 50,000 is about the same amount of people who would fill Giants stadium.  Where are all of these people going to be working around this tunnel?

Another selling point being used to justify this project is the premise that 22,000 cars will be removed from the road because the drivers (and passengers) will start taking the train to work in New York City and spend their money there.  Well, if we divide 22,000 into $8.7 billion it will cost $395,455.00 per car to remove them from the roads leading to New York City.  That does not seem to be a good investment to me!  If this number is right, lets do another calculation.  If each car has one driver and three passengers, that would be four new passengers for the Choo-Choo Tunnel.  This would be about $100,000.00 per passenger cost.  Now, if the average Choo-Choo train fare was $10.00 round trip, and each person used the train 250 times per year, it would take 40 years to just obtain the fares to pay for the tunnel alone!

Give me a break, this whole Choo-Choo train tunnel idea is just one large pork-barrel project to appease the union construction workers and pay for play construction companies!  Plus, the $8.7 billion is what they want to borrow for these projects.  It does not include the interest that will have to be paid for the bonds that will be needed to actually get their hands on the money needed for this project.  Why not keep the New Jersey money, about $3 billion, and spend it to make New Jersey a more favorable place for companies to locate and create jobs here?

To Governor Stupidhead, our lunatic Senators and all of the other idiots in Washington D.C. and Trenton, “IT’S TAXES, STUPID!”

January 17, 2009 Posted by | Borrowing, Budget, Congress, Corruption, Corzine, Crooks, Debt, democrats, Gas Tax, Hudson River Tunnel, Liberals, New Jersey, Recession, Republicans, Shore, Taxes, Tolls | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment